Tuesday, May 17, 2011

Emerging Women in Film Series: Deborah Correa


Official poster of Little Black Dress
The next profile in my Emerging Women in Film Series features Deborah Correa. She secured a deal where she sold her short film, Little Black Dress to IndieFlix, a website that showcases independent features. Viewers are able to buy DVDs or rent streaming films to support the work of indie filmmakers. Today is Deborah's official launch date with IndieFlix and I'm excited to share my interview of her with you all. Kudos to Deborah.





      
Bio: Deborah Correa graduated from Emerson College with a B.F.A. in Writing and Film, where she produced a short documentary about Colombia.  This Little Old Town was sold and premiered on PBS’ FRONTLINE/ World.  Since graduating, she’s worked on PBS documentaries. Deborah was also accepted, out of hundreds, to participate in the AFI Directing Workshop for Women, where she directed Little Black Dress, which premiered at the LA Shorts Fest and was recently sold to IndieFlix. Deborah is working on developing two features.

Miller: Tell us about your short film Little Black Dress and what inspired you to write this comedy?
Correa: Little Black Dress (LBD) was inspired by a desire to challenge myself to create a commercial, glossy rom-com with a message - on a shoestring budget. I wanted to create a fun fashion-film that resonates with what I see around me, in my friends’ lives and in my own: the desire to be the master of your world with an ideal partner at your side, all the while looking the part. We’re so caught up in fantasizing about our ideal life that we miss the moments and the people that can become our reality. Besides the obvious great fashion and romance films like The Devil Wears Prada and Bridget Jones; I was inspired by the old classics like Bringing up Baby and Philadelphia Story. The elegant restraint in those films is sexier than the overt hyper-romantic content of today; creating that tension on-screen was one of my challenges and one of my favorite moments in LBD.

Camera slate for Little Black Dress
Miller: How long have you been a filmmaker?
Correa: I've been pursuing filmmaking since I was twelve but technically I've been a filmmaker since my freshman year in college.


                        

Miller: Can you share one of your biggest challenges during production?
Correa: One of the biggest challenges during production was learning to focus solely on directing. As a woman and an amazing multi-tasker I kept taking on producing responsibilities, that I should've left up to my team. After the first day or so I realized what I was doing and put blinders on to any other task other than directing and working with the actors and my DP.

Miller: How have you promoted the film? Has it been successful?
Correa: I have gone to every festival where LBD screened; I come prepared and network as much as I can. I also carry copies of LBD with me and hand them out to people I think would be interested in acquiring or promoting it. So far so good, I just sold LBD to IndieFlix!

Miller: Did you plan on trying to find distribution for this film?
Correa: Yes, I did plan on trying to find distribution but I felt like getting LBD out there was the best way to go about finding distribution; whether that be with festivals, community screenings or special screenings. IndieFlix ended up reaching out to me.

Anne Leighton, lead actress and Chris Jarvis, the handsome
stranger enjoy a moment on the dance floor.













Miller: What do you hope to gain from your recent distribution deal?
Correa: I hope to gain exposure along with some revenue and I hope to expand LBD into a feature film and I believe that distribution helps push that along.

Miller: What director has had an influence on your work?
Correa: I love the work of filmmakers like Ken Loach, Paul Greengrass and Andrea Arnold; they all have this very naturalistic, hyper-real social realist directing style. I love the hand-held approach to very human stories. I mean there're so many filmmakers and artists that have influenced me but lately I am really drawn to realism.

Miller: What is your next project?
Correa: Beyond fleshing out LBD for a feature I'm working on a true-story drama about a girl growing up during the troubles in Northern Ireland. Though I'm still in the development stage for both I hope to be moving into pre-production very soon!

To order or view LBD, visit IndieFlix.

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